9515382

I know, I know, Christmas was two weeks ago, but I just found this book on Scribd the other day and I decided to give it a try.  It looked cute and light, so I figured I was in for a good ride.  Boy was I wrong.

Sarah Collier was a nerdy 15 year old girl, who dreamed of marrying her true love, whose identity was revealed to her by several batches of “Kismet Cookies” that she and her grandmother (Gramma Mia–as if Ms. Wilde thought it would be cute to have a grown woman not know how to pronounce the word) made every year on Christmas Eve, which was apparently a tradition in their town.  (Wouldn’t that be a little messy–not to mention wasteful?)  Unfortunately, her true love knocked up some girl and was forced to marry her (It is called a shotgun wedding, but the only thing that seems at all shot-gunny is that the invitations went out the week of the wedding).

Nine years later, Sarah is Sadie Cool, the author of a children’s book about a little girl, who goes to the North Pole to help Santa in his workshop.  As Sadie, she receives a letter from a sick little girl, who just so happens to be from the same small town where Sarah spent a lot of her childhood and where she embarrassed herself by professing her undying love for the so-called true love.  Little does she know that the little girl is TL’s daughter or that he is single because his bitch of a wife couldn’t deal with the daughter’s illness.

The set-up is a little hoaky, but I’ve seen worse work well.  I got about 120 pages into the book before I couldn’t stand the heroine’s attitude any more.  Maybe it is because she is supposed to be 24 years old and succeeded at everything she has ever tried to do, but she is very self-centered, caring more about her decade old embarrassment than anything that is actually going on in the small town of Twilight, Texas.  The only thing she does seem to care about is little Jazzy, the sick kid that wrote to her, which is something, I guess.  The fact that she acts like a teenager is really off-putting, but I might have been able to deal with it if not for the city-shaming.

Yep, this is one of those books that criticize big cities and the people who live in them.  At one point, a character even says that Sarah has lost her humanity because she has lived in Manhattan for too long.  Personally, I don’t think that Sarah has lost her humanity.  I think that she is as self-centered as she is because that is how her parents raised her to be.  They too were more concerned about themselves than with anything or anyone else, Sarah included.  Let’s place the blame where it belongs and leave city-living alone.

The one thing that I did like was Travis, Sarah’s true love and Jazzy’s father.  He is a great father and seems to genuinely care about people.  Too bad he’s saddled with Sarah.

DNF.

Elizabeth

Romance novels have been a part of my life since I was 14 years old and one of my neighbors dropped off a laundry basket full of Harlequins. From that day on, my nose was always in a book. I started my first review site in 2013, but took some time off for personal issues in 2018.

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  1. […] The First Love Cookie Club by Lori Wilde: I reviewed this one in January of last year and almost immediately DNF’ed it.  I didn’t care for the heroine and felt bad for the hero because he was too good for her.  The plot involved the heroine going back to her home town because of a sick little girl (the hero’s daughter), who was a big fan of her kid’s book. […]

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