Here on the East Coast we had a pretty big snow storm yesterday–we got more than twice what was predicted and I know a lot of people stayed home from work and school today because of the snow and frigid temperature combination.  I actually managed not shoveling today (my aunt stayed home and used the snow blower instead), but I also didn’t do any reading.  Actually, I haven’t done much reading over the last few days–I’ve been working for my family’s accountant, who is in the process of copying his client files after everything was damaged in Hurricane Sandy (why he waited over a year is beyond me), so I haven’t been home much.  When I have been able to read, I’ve been re-immersing myself in the world of the Pink Carnation, the daring spy that kept Napoleon busy in Lauren Willig’s series.

As I mentioned in the Vlog, I recently purchased a used copy of the 3rd book in the series, The Deception of the Emerald Ring, which I lost in the hurricane (I refuse to call it “superstorm” because I feel that is a term made up by the insurance companies so they could get out of paying people the money they deserved).  I already had copies of The Secret History of the Pink Carnation (book 1 in the series) and The Masque of the Black Tulip (book 2), which I initially thought I lost in the storm and by the time I realized I hadn’t, I had already told the library I had, causing them to delete it from their system.  I also have a Kindle edition of The Orchid Affair, a much later book in the series.

This is my third time reading Pink I (as Willig calls the books) and I find myself noticing things that I hadn’t in the other two times I’ve read it.  For instance, Amy seems so much more stupid this time around.  How she could have thought that Georges Marston was The Purple Gentian is beyond me.  Never mind the fact that she didn’t recognize Richard’s voice when she heard it.  She actually seems younger this time around then she did in the other readings, but that might just be because I am older now than I was then.  Amy’s actions were always childish, but because I have grown up a bit since I first read it I can see it now.  I hope the same thing doesn’t happen when I move on to the next book, as Henrietta is one of my favorite romance novel heroines.  I would hate to see her differently because I’ve gotten older and she is still 19.  That would suck.  It is also the reason I prefer older (re: at least in their 30s) heroines over the much younger, sometimes teenage heroines that populate historical romances.  True, that is what one would have found in the early 19th century, which is when the Carnation novels take place, but it is hard for me to read about these very young heroines, knowing how actual 19 and 20 year olds behave and doubting that they have changed that much in two centuries.

Anyway, what have you guys been reading during the snow storm?

Elizabeth

Romance novels have been a part of my life since I was 14 years old and one of my neighbors dropped off a laundry basket full of Harlequins. From that day on, my nose was always in a book. I started my first review site in 2013, but took some time off for personal issues in 2018.

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