wicked intentionsYesterday, after finishing Follow My Lead, I waited a few hours to jump into a new book–not because of how good it was, but because of how bad it was.  I must confess to sometimes being a bit superstitious when it comes to reading and I’m always a bit wary of starting a book after a particularly bad one.  I guess I should have waited a little longer because Wicked Intentions was even worse than Follow My Lead.  I know I had almost nothing good to say about that book, but at least it was something I could finish.  This book didn’t even allow me to get to the 20% mark before I started mocking it on twitter.  It was that bad.  Seriously.  Here’s a couple of the tweets in case you don’t believe me.

Ah, a TSTL Hero for a change.  Well, that’s something, I guess.  A few pages later, there was this gem:

Lovely, just what I want to read about–a woman who is so emotional that she just bursts into tears at the slightest provocation.

These weren’t the only problems that I had and if they were, I probably would have sucked it up and continued reading because the premise is fairly good: Lord Caire, searching for his former mistress’s murderer seeks Mrs. Temperance Dew’s help in finding the man responsible for what sure as hell sounds like a Jack the Ripper-esque murder (except more than 100 years prior to the Ripper’s killings).

Let’s put aside the fact that Caire is an early 18th Century aristocrat, who certainly wouldn’t have gone to a woman, especially a lower class woman, for help, seeing as most men (and sadly even many modern men) only saw women as a means for procreation and didn’t think they had the cognitive ability of a turnip.  That’s the least of this book’s problems.  I mean, we already have a TSTL hero and an overly emotional heroine–what’s an exceedingly contrived plot point between friends?

No, there are much worse problems that plague this book.  The language, for instance is stitled at best.  The characters say things like “of the clock” and “luncheon,” which while they may have been words used by people of that time, they just don’t flow well and took me out of the story every single time.  Besides, these were conversations between a brother and sister, so I doubt they would be this formal.

There were also some glaring research issues.  At one point Caire is at a coffeehouse to meet a friend of his and while seated, orders his coffee and pays the coffee boy. This is not at all what would have been done because coffee was actually free and he would only have paid to get into the coffeehouse, which would have happened before he got inside.  If you want to write about a period of time that is normally ignored, please do your research.  It wouldn’t kill you.

Then, there was this, which happened almost immediately after the heroine started sobbing:

Seriously?  You find sobbing chicks attractive?  You must love going to funerals, then.  Dear lord.  What did I do to deserve this?

There was also the issue with names–every single child that lived in the Foundling House (more or less an orphanage) run by Temperance’s family, is either Joseph or Mary.  That must be confusing.  Twenty-eight kids all with the same first names?  Wow.  How creative of them.

Finally, there were all the rumors about Caire’s sexual proclivities.  Temperance was warned over and over again by her ladies’ maid, Nell, that Caire would do “terrible things” to her.  It kept making me think of the theme song to True Blood. Did she once tell us what those terrible things were?  Of course not, so I was left having to wonder if he was the second coming of the Marquis de Sade.  What exactly constituted “terrible things” in this period?  I bet it was anything other than missionary style.

DNF

Elizabeth

Romance novels have been a part of my life since I was 14 years old and one of my neighbors dropped off a laundry basket full of Harlequins. From that day on, my nose was always in a book. I started my first review site in 2013, but took some time off for personal issues in 2018.

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0 Comments

  1. "Terrible things" is light bondage. Because the Hero doesn't like to be touched. But don't worry she cures him.

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