More Than You Know
I just can’t seem to get into a single book this week.  More Than You Know is  second book I’ve tried to read since finishing re-reading a book I read almost a year ago.  The other book, Less Than a Lady by Eva Devon, held my interest for about six chapters and then left me so cold that it wasn’t worth reviewing.  I had high hopes for More Than You Know, but sadly, it wasn’t what I thought it would be.  I made it just past the halfway point before giving up on it too.

I just can’t seem to get into a single book this week.  More Than You Know is  second book I’ve tried to read since finishing re-reading a book I read almost a year ago.  The other book, Less Than a Lady by Eva Devon, held my interest for about six chapters and then left me so cold that it wasn’t worth reviewing.  I had high hopes for More Than You Know, but sadly, it wasn’t what I thought it would be.  I made it just past the halfway point before giving up on it too.
Dane Harrison is a billionaire hotelier and he’s looking for a lounge singer for his new Manhattan hotel.  Acting on information from his sister, he goes to see Julia Shay and is immediately mesmerized.  He has to have her.  For his hotel.

Julia moonlights as a lounge singer, wishing for a job that would allow her to use her vocal abilities to make a living.  She doesn’t trust Dane, but after he throws an insane amount of money at her, she realizes that he’s the real deal, leaping at the chance to sing for a man as handsome as sin.

I had a few big issues with this book and the biggest was that neither the hero nor the heroine were at all likable.  Julia keeps her feelings to herself and doesn’t trust anyone, especially if he’s got loads of money and happens to have male genitalia.  She’s one of those people who was so hurt that she can’t trust any man.  Yes, there are people like that, I know 3 in my own family, but I’d like to think that for the most part people aren’t so sexist.  To be quite frank, if you find yourself thinking that all people of either gender are bad because of one bad relationship, you probably didn’t have a high opinion of that gender to begin with–and that’s not okay.  Sexism runs both ways; women don’t get a pass just because they’ve been discriminated against for as long as they can remember.

Back to Julia.  She doesn’t have relationships.  She has casual sex until it isn’t causal any more.  There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that.  If you want to have sex with scores of people, that’s your prerogative.  However, in Julia’s case, she’s doing it to hide from her feelings.  She thinks that emotions make her weak because she fell for the wrong person and her life imploded as a result.  Normally, I would find this to be an intriguing plot development, but not this time.  This time, I felt as if the book was written without feeling.  I didn’t know that was even possible.  Writing is a highly emotional thing, but something was lost here.  If this book was a person, it would have a flat affect, which is a sign of several psychological illnesses.

As for Dane, he was alright–I guess.  I just didn’t get anything from him.  He obviously loves his siblings (each of which are apparently getting their own books) and enjoys his work, but all you get to see is his interactions with Julia, which mostly include sex.  Boring sex.  How boring, you ask?  So boring that I stopped reading in the middle of their first sex scene and didn’t pick the book up again for five hours.  Five hours.  Then, when I did go back to it, I found myself thinking of other things and losing track of where I was in the book.  That is not a good thing at all.

This is honestly one of those books that I have to wonder how it got published.  When I’ve gotten to that point, I just can’t go on with it.  Tomorrow, I’m going to jump into Christmas in Lucky Harbor (basically a re-issue of the first two books in that series plus the Christmas novella).  At least, I know I like those books.

DNF

Elizabeth

Romance novels have been a part of my life since I was 14 years old and one of my neighbors dropped off a laundry basket full of Harlequins. From that day on, my nose was always in a book. I started my first review site in 2013, but took some time off for personal issues in 2018.

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *